Hi, I’m Cynthia Saver, MS, RN, president of CLS Development, Inc., which provides writing and editing services, and editor of Anatomy of Writing for Publication for Nurses, 4th ed. I’m also past editorial director for American Nurse Journal.

I’ve been a full-time professional nurse writer and editor for many years, and that doesn’t count the writing I did as I fulfilled my nursing roles in clinical, research, education, and management. My passion is helping nurses share their expertise through the written word, including, but not limited to, publication. Writing can be scary and intimidating. I hope to make it less so and to help you develop your writing skills the same way you’ve developed your nursing skills. Whether you’re considering your first or your 50th publication, want to contribute to your organization’s newsletter, or crave to be a better communicator online and in print, I hope you’ll find what I write helpful. The nurse publishing colleagues I’ve learned from over the years (many of whom are contributors to my book) may not be listed by name, but I’m grateful for their willingness to share. In that spirit, I’m looking forward to sharing with you! If you have feedback, feel free to email me at csaver@healthcommedia.com.

Age in publishing: What’s in a name?

Elderly, seniors, aged — what’s the right terminology to use when writing about, well, older people? It’s worth considering this in an era of...
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Who is an author?

Determining who should be named as an author for an article isn’t as simple as it might seem, yet it’s critical to those involved....
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New report on predatory journals

A new international report on predatory journals tells an alarming tale—the organizations behind these journals are becoming more sophisticated, making detection more difficult for...
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Powerful paragraphs

Proteins frequently are called the building blocks of life, and paragraphs the building blocks of an article. Thoughtfully crafted paragraphs keep readers’ attention as...
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The awesome outline

How can an outline be awesome? When it helps you write more efficiently and more effectively. Think of an outline as a care plan...
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Resolve to write!

Make a 'SMART' New Year's resolution. It’s time to ditch the traditional New Year’s resolutions. After all, how many times can you resolve to lose...
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Writing effective business emails

Have you ever had someone not respond to your email? Or fail to respond for days on end? Or not answer your question in...
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Powerful posters

Posters are an excellent way to disseminate your work, including research studies and quality improvement and evidence-based practice projects. Presenting a poster at a...
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Three steps to avoid predatory journals

Predatory journals prey on unsuspecting authors, luring them with promises of quick peer review and publication. The catch is that these journals put profit...
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Guidelines for bolstering writing success

Evidence-based guidelines, one of the hallmarks of nursing practice, are a tool that helps ensure patients achieve optimal outcomes. Guidelines also can be a...
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A formula for writing success

Most writers are more comfortable with words than numbers, particularly when math is involved. We tend to remember English or literature classes from school...
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When not to recycle: the perils of text recycling

Recycling has become an essential tool for protecting the environment, with most of us embracing it as we strive to “do our part” for...

6 types of editorial queries and how to respond

Great news: Your article has been accepted for publication! It’s time to celebrate and get ready for the next step in the publishing process—reviewing...
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Writing resources

The fourth edition of Anatomy of Writing for Publication for Nurses was released in January, and I’m thankful to the team of 28 contributors...
effective-peer-review

Effective peer reviews in 3 easy steps

Most well-respected journals are peer reviewed, although controversy exists as to its true value. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), which publishes...

From school to print

You revel in the “A” you received for your latest school paper. Is the next step to publish your article? It might be, but...

Promotion—the last step in writing for publication

You smile as you sign off on the final version of your article slated to be published in a well-respected journal. Your first article...
predatory journals

Is your topic suitable for your target journal? Three questions to ask

As editorial director for American Nurse Journal, it’s my job to field what we call “queries”—emails from nurses asking if a topic would be...

Writing challenge: Narrow the topic

One of the greatest challenges in writing is narrowing the topic. Beginning and experienced writers alike frequently want to tackle topics that are too...

Follow the four Cs for effective writing

Developing writing skills relies on the ability to effectively use the tools of written communication. In nursing school, you learned that proteins are made...

Why the reference list matters

References are the lifeblood of an article. They support your message and enable readers to seek out additional information. But authors too often fail...

Letters to the editor: Make your voice heard

Journal articles aren’t the only way you can disseminate information. Letters to the editors—if done correctly—can be a powerful way to make your voice...

Sharing your story

“Once upon a time…” Those three simple words probably conjure childhood memories of listening to your parents tell a tale of wonder or reading magical...

We need young writers

April 10 is National Encourage a Young Writer Day. While it might not generate the excitement of National Chocolate Day (October 28, or everyday...
Editing

Self-editing: Challenging but essential

As you finish typing those last few words of your manuscript, it’s tempting to breathe a sigh of relief, shut down the computer, call...

The power of parallelism

Writers might not have superpowers like Superman, Wonder Woman, and others in the DC Universe, but we can use powers (tools) to improve the...

Ask before you write: Crafting the query

Beginning authors may not realize that before submitting a manuscript, it’s a good idea to send a query—an email to the editor of a...

Is your knowledge cursing your writing?

We nurses tend to take great pride in our knowledge. After all, we exert great effort to stay on top of the latest medical...
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Why author guidelines matter

When asked to list their biggest frustrations with authors, most editors would put “not following author guidelines” at or near the top. I’ve commiserated...
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Kicking off the collaborative writing team

Writing doesn’t have to be a solitary activity; in fact, coauthors can make the process easier. I was part of a writing team for...

7 tips for eliminating the ‘no time’ writing excuse

An oft-cited excuse for not writing is, “I don’t have the time.” (I confess to using it myself on more than one occasion.) The...

Yes, you can write

I often meet nurses who say they “wish” they could write, but know they “can’t.” I counter with “Yes, you can” because I know...

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