August 2007 Vol. 2 No. 8

All for one, and one for all

Let’s validate and value the contributions of foreign-educated nurses who come to this country seeking opportunities to practice.

During an emergency: Be safe!

Thousands of accidental chemical spills and leaks take place in this country each year. Providing nurses with adequate first-receiver training can help ensure that we can care for contaminated patients without endangering ourselves.

Halting postpartum hemorrhage

When excessive blood loss during delivery threatens a mother’s life, quick assessment, effective interventions, and expert aid from the rapid response team maneuver her postpartum course back onto a normal track.

Making a stand against malignant melanoma

Summer sizzles on, sun-worshipers soak up the rays. Years later, your ability to detect melanoma in its early stages could spell the difference between a patient’s prompt treatment and a grim prognosis.

Ogilvie’s syndrome: No ordinary constipation

A patient complains of bloating, abdominal tenderness, and constipation. Nothing unusual? Maybe. But if you’re too quick to dismiss these symptoms, you could be overlooking a serious condition called Ogilvie’s syndrome.

Persevering against pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Despite recent gains in treating pulmonary arterial hypertension, a cure is a long way off. Diagnosis and therapy can be tricky, and prognosis remains poor. Still, there are ways nurses can help slow disease progression and improve quality of life for a child with this condition.

Snakes at the nursing station

It’s not easy, but confrontation is your best response to a backstabbing coworker who specializes in sabotage or an overbearing bully with an itch for intimidation.

estrogen women woman note

Take Note – August 2007

Good news for younger women taking estrogen     Estrogen therapy may have cardioprotective effects for women who start taking it in…

The freeing force of laughter

By reciting wacky dialogue from a scene in a Monty Python movie, Mary Delisle, RN, interrupted the negative thought patterns of a patient mired in dread and dispair.

Therapeutic storytelling in nursing practice

Storytelling is a useful way to promote holistic care. The next time your patient shows poor coping ability, you might want to ask him to tell a story about what he’s experiencing.

What to do when you’re being investigated

Being under scrutiny can rattle even the toughest RN. Our legal expert, LaTonia Denise Wright, BSN, RN, JD, explains how to protect your rights if you’re caught up in a regulatory or law enforcement investigation.

Work/life balance? Yes, please!

The young nurses now entering our profession have a lot to teach us veterans about the value of balancing work and home life.

Reader Survey

Please share your feedback! We’re interested to learn more about your experience with American Nurse Journal.

cheryl meeGet your free access to the exclusive newsletter of American Nurse Journal and gain insights for your nursing practice.

NurseLine Newsletter

  • Hidden

*By submitting your e-mail, you are opting in to receiving information from Healthcom Media and Affiliates. The details, including your email address/mobile number, may be used to keep you informed about future products and services.