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Sharps injury prevention

A look at safety 20 years after legislation passes. The year 2020 gives nurses the opportunity to reflect on past successes and opportunities so that...

Building programs to reduce sharps injuries from insulin injection

Your involvement in safety programs and device evaluation and selection protects everyone. Takeaways: Increases in incidence of diabetes can result in increasing incidence of sharps...

A renewed focus on preventing sharps injuries in the operating room

In July, the American Nurses Association (ANA) hosted its first in-person Sharps Injury (SI) Prevention Stakeholder meeting. Experts, advocates, specialists, and frontline nurses from varied backgrounds with global renown convened to discuss the state of sharps injuries and needlesticks in U.S. health care. With hepatitis C infections and associated comorbidities, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and coinfection with hepatitis B, HIV or multidrug resistant organisms, at an all-time high, especially among baby boomers, renewing focus and making concerted efforts to reduce sharps injuries and bloodborne and infectious disease exposures is time critical.

Sharps injuries: Where we stand today

Needlesticks and other sharps-related exposures to bloodborne pathogens (including HIV, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus) continue to pose a significant occupational risk...

Safe sharps disposal in the home

Nurses can easily dispose of sharps in the hospital, but it’s not so easy for patients at home. Learn how you can educate patients to keep them safe and the environment healthy.

Practical strategies to prevent surgical sharps injuries

Many facilities still don’t follow sharps safety best practices and continue to underreport needlestick injuries.

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