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prevent sepsis among infants

Probiotics may prevent sepsis in infants

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A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial reported in Nature notes that combining a probiotic with fructo-oligosaccharide significantly reduces sepsis and mortality in newborns in rural India at a cost of $1 per infant.

 

Probiotics may prevent sepsis in infants

 

read more at nature.com

 

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Sepsis occurs when chemicals released in the bloodstream to fight an infection trigger inflammation throughout the body. This can cause a cascade of changes that damage multiple organ systems, leading them to fail, sometimes even resulting in death. Symptoms include fever, difficulty breathing, low blood pressure, fast heart rate, and mental confusion. Treatment includes antibiotics and intravenous fluids.

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your health, especially your digestive system. We usually think of bacteria as something that causes diseases. But your body is full of bacteria, both good and bad. Probiotics are often called “good” or “helpful” bacteria because they help keep your gut healthy.

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The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or recommendations of the American Nurses Association, the Editorial Advisory Board members, or the Publisher, Editors and staff of American Nurse Journal. This has not been peer reviewed.

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