Off the Charts


Perspectives on nursing from a non-nurse

Hi, I’m Julie Cullen, managing editor of American Nurse Today and curator of online content for our website. I’m most definitely not a nurse, but I admire what all of you do everyday. To show my appreciation, I’ve created the Off the Charts blog to share some of my experiences as a patient and family member of patients, thoughts and ideas that occur to me during my work editing nursing content, and information I think you might be interested in. I welcome your feedback, especially if you discover that I’ve gotten something wrong in my descriptions of the work you do. You can submit a comment on the website or email me at jcullen@healthcommedia.com.

Caring for patients with special needs—Share your stories

This month, I’m going to be paying attention to nursing and patients with special needs, with an emphasis on developmental and intellectual disorders. I’ve found some articles I’d like to share with all of...

Can you put a price on OR time?

Have you ever considered the cost of operating room (OR) time? If you’re a nurse manager, you may find this cross-sectional analysis of OR costs interesting. The analysis of 302 critical care hospitals in...

Nurses and automation work together for early sepsis detection

Sepsis, which requires quick intervention, is often hard to detect because the clinical signs and symptoms vary and may mimic other health conditions. The result is a sepsis mortality rate that ranges from 28%...

Where have all the hospitals gone?

Did you know that the maximum number of U.S. hospitalizations occurred in 1981? Since then, the population has increased by 40%, but hospitalizations have decreased by 10%. The result? The number of U.S. hospitals...

Recommended reading

Jon Templeman, BSN, RN, posted this blog on the American Nurse Today website in November 2017. I suggest you give it a read, not just for what he shares about his experience as a...

Is hospice care a two-way street?

As a non-nurse, my perception of why nurses decide to work in hospice care centers around patients and families—relieving pain, assuaging fears, answering questions, being a comfort. But then I read a personal essay...

Hospice nursing: A slower pace of care

It had never occurred to me before, but it makes perfect sense—hospice care moves at a slower pace than typical nursing. Nurses (and patients) have all experienced the fast, efficient movement’s of nurses performing...

Hospice—A lodging for travelers

My step-father helped establish a hospice in rural West Virginia. He never said why he got involved in this effort, but I suspect it had to do with the experience he had during my...