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Workplace violence: A nurse tells her story

It’s not okay, and it is a big deal. By Lillee Gelinas, MSN, RN, CPPS, FAAN “Personal boundary violation is not part of our job description....

The opioid crisis and the matter of consent

Lives in the balance By Leah Curtin, RN, ScD(h), FAAN It’s 3 am and you’re called to an apartment complex for a person down. You arrive...

Honorable Mention Awards

Perioperative team, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia The Fox Chase Cancer Center perioperative team noticed delays in getting patients to surgery. After investigating, the team...

All-Pro Nursing Team Awards

In celebration of Nurses Week, American Nurse Today launched the All-Pro Nursing Team Awards. First Place: Quick action grants a family’s final wish Coordinators of patient...

Splash safety—Protecting your eyes, Part 2

Learn how to reduce the risk and what to do if an injury occurs. Takeaways: Preventing blood and body fluid exposures depends on surveillance,...

The American Nurses Memorial of Bordeaux

For nurses who die in service By Marsha Fowler, PhD, MDiv, RN, FAAN; Nathalie Laurent, MA, RN; Martha Turner, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN Nursing is a risky...

Inspire, innovate, and influence

Let’s work together to tackle public health issues.  With National Nurses Weekcoming soon, we’ll be publicly recognized for our many positive contributions to healthcare at...

Our heritage, our future: Why we celebrate nursing

The global community stands together to honor nursing’s important role. Every year, someone asks, “Why single out nurses for a weeklong celebration? Every profession should...

Families and post-intensive care syndrome

Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) is defined as new or increased physical, cognitive, or mental health impairment in a patient after hospitalization in a critical care unit. Similarly, post-intensive care syndrome-family (PICS-F) refers to new or increased cognitive or mental health impairment in family members after a loved one is hospitalized in a critical care setting.

Everyone is responsible for a culture of safety

Whether you’re a direct-care nurse or a leader, you’re responsible for speaking up and taking action to keep patients safe. Takeaways: Direct care nurses are...