Critical Care Advisor
This special edition of Critical Care Advisor provides you with relevant information that can be used in your practice immediately. American Nurse Journal is committed to delivering authoritative research translated into content that keeps nurses up to date on best practices. Articles are written by nurses…for nurses in all clinical specialties and practice settings. Read on to help maximize patient outcomes.

Critical Care Advisor

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Critical Care Advisor

Challenging nursing’s sacred cows

Do you routinely instill normal saline solution into endotracheal tubes before suctioning? Use only the Glasgow Coma Scale for neurologic assessment? Evidence on these and other sacred cows of nursing practice might surprise you.

colonoscopy cancer note nurse healthcare

Take Note – December 2007

Previous pneumonia vaccination reduces ICU admissions Among adults hospitalized for pneumonia, those who’ve been vaccinated against the disease are less likely than unvaccinated patients to require admission to an intensive…

Putting the breaks on pulmonary edema

I.V. fluids should help a dehydrated patient, but for one with a history of atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease, they could contribute to pulmonary edema. For Grace Johnson, quick assessment and action staved off a poor outcome.

To sleep, perchance to heal

Sleep doesn’t come easily for ICU patients. Many suffer chronic sleep deprivation, which can raise stress levels, depress immune responses, and impair wound healing. To help them sleep, some ICU’s are enforcing regular quite times.

Sepsis signposts: Can you spot them?

Sepsis can show up in any setting. So even if you don’t work in a critical care unit, you need to know how to detect it. This article describes warning signs that should arouse your suspicion.