Critical Care Advisor
This special edition of Critical Care Advisor provides you with relevant information that can be used in your practice immediately. American Nurse Journal is committed to delivering authoritative research translated into content that keeps nurses up to date on best practices. Articles are written by nurses…for nurses in all clinical specialties and practice settings. Read on to help maximize patient outcomes.

Critical Care Advisor

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Critical Care Advisor

The freeing force of laughter

By reciting wacky dialogue from a scene in a Monty Python movie, Mary Delisle, RN, interrupted the negative thought patterns of a patient mired in dread and dispair.

Halting postpartum hemorrhage

When excessive blood loss during delivery threatens a mother’s life, quick assessment, effective interventions, and expert aid from the rapid response team maneuver her postpartum course back onto a normal track.

Ogilvie’s syndrome: No ordinary constipation

A patient complains of bloating, abdominal tenderness, and constipation. Nothing unusual? Maybe. But if you’re too quick to dismiss these symptoms, you could be overlooking a serious condition called Ogilvie’s syndrome.

During an emergency: Be safe!

Thousands of accidental chemical spills and leaks take place in this country each year. Providing nurses with adequate first-receiver training can help ensure that we can care for contaminated patients without endangering ourselves.

Persevering against pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Despite recent gains in treating pulmonary arterial hypertension, a cure is a long way off. Diagnosis and therapy can be tricky, and prognosis remains poor. Still, there are ways nurses can help slow disease progression and improve quality of life for a child with this condition.

type 2 diabetes

Take Note – July 2007

On-line video-based course on emergency preparedness   The need for better coordination between governmental agencies and hospitals became apparent after 9/11 and again after Hurricane Katrina. To fill this need, Homeland…

Letters to the Editor – July 2007

Oversight not needed As a recent graduate of a nurse practitioner (NP) program, I appreciated your article “Retail-based clinics: New option for nurses” in the March issue. You provided a…

PA catheter controversy

Standard of care in the ICU – or object of overuse, abuse, and misuse? The authors explain why they believe PA catheter use may harm more critically ill patients than it helps.