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Skin Tear Survey

Skin tears are acute wounds resulting from trauma to the skin. The appropriate care of the patient with a skin tear can present a...

Dealing with the dangers of dog bites

Dog bites can cause serious or even fatal injuries. Find out how to assess and intervene when your patient has been bitten.

NEJM studies support bystander compression only CPR

Two studies published July 29 by the New England Journal of Medicine support compression only CPR for bystanders. Both found no difference in patient...

What every nurse needs to know about the clinical aspects of child abuse

Child-abuse cases can be the mot difficult ones for nurses to cope with. But with the right knowledge and tools, you can care for abused children more effectively.

Derailing disaster after pulmonary aspiration

Thanks to an alert nurse, an elderly patient avoids respiratory failure during her recovery from hip fracture surgery.

AACN President unveils new theme

On May 19, Kristine J. Peterson, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, the new president of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, unveiled AACN’s theme for...

Saving a snakebite victim

While hiking, Paul Sawyer, age 31, is bitten twice on the right hand by a rattlesnake. When he arrives at the emergency department (ED), the team obtains STAT laboratory tests, including a complete blood count, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, fibrin, chemistry panel, blood typing and crossmatch, urinalysis, and urine myoglobin.

My First Day in the ED

Note: This article was written before Kenneth graduated from nursing school. My first experience in an emergency department (ED) setting happened last week at Frankfort...

Evaluating the neurologic status of unconscious patients

Assessing the neurologic status of unconscious or comatose patients can be a challenge because they can’t cooperate actively with your examination. But once you...

Attacking anterior-wall myocardial infarction in time

More than 1 million Americans a year suffer a myocardial infarction (MI). This article tells you how - and how quickly - you need to respond to the most dangerous MI.