education

A need to feed the pipeline

Looking at challenges and solutions to increasing nursing faculty. How does the United States educate more nurses if there aren’t…

A Year of Gifts

Our editor-in-chief reviews important accomplishments in the past year and presents a nursing "wish list".

Act fast against anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis can kill within minutes unless the victim receives immediate treatment. Calling a rapid response team to the scene can avert disaster.

Airway pressure release ventilation: A boost for spontaneous breathing

Many clinicians are using this mechanical ventilation mode to help reduce lung damage, pneumonia, and other complications of ventilation. Find out how it works, when it’s indicated, how it preserves spontaneous breathing, and why it reduces sedation requirements.

Anatomy lesson 101

ANA’s National Center for Nursing Quality promotes nursing quality and patient safety while helping nurses advocate for themselves.

Are you an ABG ace?

Can you interpret arterial blood gas (ABG) values with confidence? To find out, test yourself with the case studies in this article.

Are you prepared for malaria?

Global traveling brings about 1,000 cases of malaria to this country each year. Don’t be caught off guard if you encounter it in your practice.

Be a coach for novice nurses

The transition from the educational setting to the practice setting can be intimidating. Make it easier by guiding novice nurses.

Be a myth-buster: Stop the misconceptions about fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia produces many symptoms but no signs, so some clinicians dismiss it as a wastebasket diagnosis. But the pain is very real, and patients with fibromyalgia need you to understand their pain – and try to relieve it.

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BSN in ten

Nurse leaders nationwide promote measure to benefit patient care and RNs’ careers. To garner support for a measure that promotes…

Cartoonist with a cause

The cartoons of Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CED, help patients cope with diabetes.

online learning

COVID-19’s effects on education

The enormity of this unprecedented, global pandemic cannot be overstated—the COVID-19 virus has sent shockwaves across the globe. No sector…
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Easing your way back to school

Place a checkmark on the line next to each statement that applies to you: You’ve seen how quickly your nursing…

Exploring massage therapy as a career option

A nurse-turned-massage therapist found that hands-on interaction with massage clients reconnected her to one of the most fulfilling aspects of nursing – contact through caring, noninvasive touch.

Find the best route to your career destination

To move your career up a notch, should you go back to school or pursue nonacademic options? The authors’ advice can help you decide on the best professional development route.

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From Your ANA President

No matter how long we’ve been in practice, we can all remember our nursing school experience. Giving our first injection,…

From your ANA President and ANF Chair

We both have been fortunate to enjoy a long association with the American Nurses Foundation (ANF), the charitable and philanthropic…
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Frontiers of nursing education

As student needs and priorities shift, education adapts. By Janet Boivin, BSN, RN In less than half a century, nursing…

Get Savvy to syncope

Syncope is a common occurrence and is commonly benign. But sometimes a swoon signals a serious underlying condition. Learn what causes syncope and how to assess and intervene for a patient who has just experienced it.

Getting a grip on GERD

Most patients manage the heartburn, nausea, and belching of gastroesophegeal reflux disease with lifestyle changes and medications. But some may experience a dangerous symptom cluster that warns of more serious problems.

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Grooming our future leaders

The future of nursing may be in jeopardy. For almost a decade, we’ve known that when the current shortage peaks…

Halting postpartum hemorrhage

When excessive blood loss during delivery threatens a mother’s life, quick assessment, effective interventions, and expert aid from the rapid response team maneuver her postpartum course back onto a normal track.

Helping new nurses set priorities

After several weeks of classes and partnered orientation to patient care, novice nurses in our large acute-care health system have learned a great deal. Still, most admit their priority-setting skills could be better.

Helping patients survive sepsis

In its early stages, sepsis can be difficult to detect.
Learn about the sometimes-subtle signs and symptoms.

Herbal facts, herbal fallacies

Many people assume herbs can’t cause harm, and neglect to tell healthcare providers they’re using them. This article will boost your herbal awareness and help you eradicate herbal ignorance among patients, colleagues, family, and friends.

Issues up close

ANA’s “Bringing Immunity to Every Community” campaign aims to boost RNs’ knowledge of immunization, encourage them to get vaccinated, and position them as leading immunization advocates.

Making a stand against malignant melanoma

Summer sizzles on, sun-worshipers soak up the rays. Years later, your ability to detect melanoma in its early stages could spell the difference between a patient’s prompt treatment and a grim prognosis.

Microalbumin: Little test, big payoff

The earlier renal disease is detected, the better. That’s why the microalbumin test is so important for patients with certain chronic conditions.

Mumps on the rebound

After decades of dormancy, mumps is back and could be making an appearacne soon at a clinic or hospital near you.

Myths about being a new nurse

During my 8 years as an RN, I’ve had the opportunity to precept several nurses and student nurses. After the…
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Off to school: A guide for nurses

Preparation, organization, and involvement are your keys to success. Going back to school is an exciting—and sometimes scary—endeavor. First, pat…

Ogilvie’s syndrome: No ordinary constipation

A patient complains of bloating, abdominal tenderness, and constipation. Nothing unusual? Maybe. But if you’re too quick to dismiss these symptoms, you could be overlooking a serious condition called Ogilvie’s syndrome.

Our Readers Respond

Mindfulness practice Thank you, Dr. Cipriano, for your editorial on mindfulness practice to assist in the grief process (“Breath at…

Paget’s disease: A therapy update

Pain, arthritis, fractures, and skeletal deformities are calling cards of Paget’s disease. A new one-dose drug therapy can produce extended remission.

Persevering against pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Despite recent gains in treating pulmonary arterial hypertension, a cure is a long way off. Diagnosis and therapy can be tricky, and prognosis remains poor. Still, there are ways nurses can help slow disease progression and improve quality of life for a child with this condition.

PhD vs. DNP

PhD vs. DNP

Find fulfillment by making the right choice. Nurses have two options for pursuing a terminal degree—doctor of philosophy (PhD) and doctor…

Preventing airway obstruction

Complications of an anterior cervical fusion did not lead to an airway obstruction because of one nurse’s assessment skills and critical thinking.

Putting the breaks on pulmonary edema

I.V. fluids should help a dehydrated patient, but for one with a history of atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease, they could contribute to pulmonary edema. For Grace Johnson, quick assessment and action staved off a poor outcome.

reader feedback October 2018

Reader Feedback: October 2018

THIS IS WHERE we share some of the comments, insights, and thoughts we receive from readers. Contact us at myamericannurse.com/send-letter-editor.…

Saving lives with continuous ST-segment monitoring

Manay dangerous ischemic events are clinically silent. Continuous ST-segment monitoring gives early warning of the silent ischemia that many other diagnostic methods fail to detect.

Sepsis signposts: Can you spot them?

Sepsis can show up in any setting. So even if you don’t work in a critical care unit, you need to know how to detect it. This article describes warning signs that should arouse your suspicion.

SWAT nursing specialty

SWAT nursing: A unique specialty

What does SWAT stand for? So Where Are They? Smart, Witty, and Talented? Smiling, Willing, Able, Technical? (more…)
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Take Note – July 2007

On-line video-based course on emergency preparedness   The need for better coordination between governmental agencies and hospitals became apparent after 9/11…
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Take Note – November 2007

Medical illiteracy can kill A 6-year study of 3,260 patients ages 65 and older found that almost 40% of those…

Taking action against acute COPD

Each year, emergency departments see about 1.5 million patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Update your knowledge of the disease and its treatment.

Taking it to the top

The Doctor of Nursing Practice degree has aroused confusion and controversy. Learn why.

Teaching Ostomy Care

WEB EXCLUSIVE – More information on teaching patients ostomy care.  Please download PDF for best viewing.

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The many merits of mentoring

Have you ever felt unsure about your next career step or just needed advice from a more seasoned professional? Natalie…
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The power of one voice

Dizziness, profuse sweating, a gnawing sensation in the pit of your stomach. Are these symptoms of the latest virus? No—they’re…

The science of skin peels

Learn how slathering a chemical solution over the face or abrading it with a stream of crystals rejuvenates the skin. This article takes you under the skin surface and walks you through the steps of a superficial skin peel.

Top 5 education apps for nurses

The world needs nurses now more than ever, and nursing students should be as prepared as possible before entering a…

Using antibiotics effectively for acute-care patients

In the ever-escalating war between bacteria and human beings, some of the bugs are outsmarting us. Here’s what you need to know about antibiotic therapy to help reduce bacterial resistance and optimize therapy for patients with acute infections.

What you can learn from failure

Editor’s note: At American Nurse Today, we believe every nurse can be a leader. Rose Sherman, founder of the Emerging RN Leader blog (www.emergingrnleader.com), contributes articles on a regular basis to help nurses achieve their leadership potential. Rachel is an experienced critical care nurse who prides herself on her

What’s the latest on lipoproteins

A new lab technique called segmented gradient gel electrophoresis identifies subclasses of cholesterol and more precisely predicts your patient’s cardiac risk.

When all signs point to long QT syndrome

A patient’s brief loss of consciousness leads to discovery of long QT syndrome. By thinking fast and making all the right moves, you can stave off the threat of torsades de pointes.

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