Cardiovascular

A new oral anticoagulant hits the market

Pradaxa gives clinicians a new tool for preventing strokes and
blood clots in patients with atrial fibrillation. Learn how it works,
who’s eligible to receive it, and how to administer it.

A woman’s worst enemy

Most women woefully underestimate their risk for heart disease. Although breast cancer gets more publicity, heart disease and stroke kill nearly 12 times as many American women. This article details gender-based differences in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention and discusses strategies to raise awareness of women’s cardiovascular risks.

Advances in blood transfusion

Ongoing research, development, and vigilance initiatives are designed to make blood components safer and more easily available.

AHA launches new stroke initiative

The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association has launched Together to End Stroke, a national initiative to bring stroke awareness…

Anatomy lesson 101

ANA’s National Center for Nursing Quality promotes nursing quality and patient safety while helping nurses advocate for themselves.

Are you prepared for malaria?

Global traveling brings about 1,000 cases of malaria to this country each year. Don’t be caught off guard if you encounter it in your practice.

Challenge to CPR

In the Jan. 27 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, Gust H. Bardy, MD, suggests the value of…

Coffee drinking and arrhythmias

Coffee drinkers are less likely to be hospitalized for cardiac arrhythmias, according to a report presented at the American Heart…

Detecting cardiac injury with telemetry

With multi-lead telemetry monitoring, a nurse detects dangerous changes in her patient’s heart rhythm, permitting quick action before an acute MI does permanent damage.

Detecting, managing, and preventing pulmonary embolism

Detecting, managing, and preventing pulmonary embolism

Pulmonary embolism (PE) kills about 25% of those it strikes. This article explains how deep vein thrombosis (DVT) sets the stage for PE and describes how to assess, manage, and prevent both DVT and PE.

Detecting, managing, and preventing pulmonary embolism

Detecting, managing, and preventing pulmonary embolism

Pulmonary embolism (PE) kills about 25% of those it strikes. This article explains how deep vein thrombosis (DVT) sets the stage for PE and describes how to assess, manage, and prevent both DVT and PE.

Does your workplace culture need CPR?

If you suspect your workplace culture is “ill,” assessment is a crucial first step. Using an established assessment tool can help ensure more thorough data collection.

Drugs and Devices Today

2/11/10 Recall of AEDs On February 3, Cardiac Science Corporation issued a recall for about 12,200 automated external defibrillators because…

Drugs Today – August 2008

Web Exclusive! An update of drug news, including alerts, approvals, and removals, at www.AmericanNurseToday.com/journal.

Drugs Today – November 2008

Web Exclusive! An update of drug news, including alerts, approvals, and removals at www.AmericanNurseToday.com/journal.

Exercise is key part of stroke recovery

Exercise should be prescribed for stroke survivors because it can significantly reduce disability and the risk of recurrent stroke, according…

FDA approves Brilinta for ACSs

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Brilinta (ticarelor) for reducing cardiovascular death and heart attack in patients…

FDA approves losartan generic

On April 6, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first generic versions of two drugs used for the…

FDA approves new hemophilia treatment

On June 6, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Eloctate, Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), Fc fusion protein, for use…

FDA recalls Alere diagnostic tests

On July 11, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the recall Alere Triage’s rapid diagnostic test system, which…

FDA restructures oncology organization

U.S. Food and Drug Administration reorganized the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Office of Oncology Drug Products under a…

February is American Heart Month

Heart disease has probably already touched you or someone you know. Make it your mission to fight heart disease and…

Four new guidelines from AHA, ACC

The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have released four guidelines related to preventing cardiovascular disease: cholesterol,…
cpr cardiopulmonary resuscitation

From your ANA President

As healthcare professionals, we all know CPR to mean “cardiopulmonary resuscitation,” and we have all been trained in how to…

Get Savvy to syncope

Syncope is a common occurrence and is commonly benign. But sometimes a swoon signals a serious underlying condition. Learn what causes syncope and how to assess and intervene for a patient who has just experienced it.

HAART and its effects on the heart

Many patients with HIV/AIDS are doing well on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Yet HAART can increase cardiovascular risks by reducing high-density lipoprotein levels, raising triglyceride levels, and causing insulin resistance.

Halting postpartum hemorrhage

When excessive blood loss during delivery threatens a mother’s life, quick assessment, effective interventions, and expert aid from the rapid response team maneuver her postpartum course back onto a normal track.

Helping patients survive sepsis

In its early stages, sepsis can be difficult to detect.
Learn about the sometimes-subtle signs and symptoms.

Heparin labels change May 1

As of May 1, manufacturers of Heparin Sodium Injection, USP and Heparin Lock Flush Solution, USP are required to use…

Hospital-acquired infections mortalities, costs

Two common conditions caused by hospital-acquired infections killed 48,000 people and ramped up health care costs by $8.1 billion in 2006 alone, according to a study released Feb. 22 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

How to recognize and respond to hypovolemic shock

How to recognize and respond to hypovolemic shock

Fluid loss…poor tissue perfusion…oxygen deprivation…acidosis…multisystem organ failure. Unless interrupted, the scary chain of events in hypovolemic shock leads to death. Learn how to hault this perilous process with early assessment and masterful management.

Improving the care of stroke patients

Is your facility doing enough to help stroke patients survive and regain functional independence? Find out how a national evidence-based initiative helps hospitals deliver better stroke care.

Iron deficiency may increase VTE risk

A study of patients with hemorrhagic telangiectasia reported in Thorax found that low serum iron was associated with increased coagulation…

Managing acute decompensated heart failure

Patients with stable chronic heart failure may suddenly start decompensating. Do you know how to recognize this condition and help avert organ failure?

Meat type matters

Eating processed meats such as hot dogs, but not red (unprocessed) meat, is associated with a higher incidence of coronary…

NeoProfen recalled

Lundbeck Inc. has recalled two lots of NeoProfen (ibuprofen lysine) that failed to meet a visible particulate quality requirement. NeoProfen…

New CPR guidelines released

The new 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR & ECC, from the American Heart Association, were released on Oct. 18. Access…

New gout guidelines published

The American College of Rheumatology has published new guidelines for the management of gout in Arthritis Care & Research. Read…

Obesity treatment devices resource

“Obesity Treatment Devices,” a section on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website, provides information on the only two…

Our Readers Respond

Overcoming the fear of floating “Tips for floaters” (March 2010) accurately described the floater’s dilemma. By showing both sides of…

PA catheter controversy

Standard of care in the ICU – or object of overuse, abuse, and misuse? The authors explain why they believe PA catheter use may harm more critically ill patients than it helps.

Pediatric stroke

Learn more about this rare but dangerous condition.

Peril on Periphery

Peripheral arterial disease is all too common – and all too often goes unrecognized.

Persevering against pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Despite recent gains in treating pulmonary arterial hypertension, a cure is a long way off. Diagnosis and therapy can be tricky, and prognosis remains poor. Still, there are ways nurses can help slow disease progression and improve quality of life for a child with this condition.

Putting the breaks on pulmonary edema

I.V. fluids should help a dehydrated patient, but for one with a history of atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease, they could contribute to pulmonary edema. For Grace Johnson, quick assessment and action staved off a poor outcome.

Quiz time

A 34-year-old patient arrives in the emergency department after hurting his leg during a soccer game. He says he has…

Quiz Time

Which type of temporary pacing usually is used for a patient having major cardiac surgery? a. Epicardial pacing b. Transvenous…

Quiz Time

A goal of the induction phase of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is to: a. quickly warm the patient to…
Hypertensive

Responding to a hypertensive crisis

Clifton Jones, an African-American male aged 59, comes to the emergency department (ED) complaining of headache and blurred vision. After…

Right-sided heart failure

Give the right side of the heart the attention it’s due. Takeaways: In right-sided heart failure, ventricular independence (between the…

Saving lives with continuous ST-segment monitoring

Manay dangerous ischemic events are clinically silent. Continuous ST-segment monitoring gives early warning of the silent ischemia that many other diagnostic methods fail to detect.

Seeing Red

American Heart Month is a time to celebrate the wealth of information that if acted on, can help prevent cardiovascular disease.

Shhhhhh! Quiet zone

Nurses play a significant role in helping patients to get the sleep they need.

Stemming a lethal immunologic response

When a patient shows signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, her survival hinges on the nurse's expert assessment skills and the clinical team's swift interventions.

This content is for Digital Access and Print Plus subscribers only.

Stopping a downward spiral

For a patient with chronic heart failure, failure to take prescribed diuretics triggers a perilous chain of events

Stroke in pregnancy on the rise

A study published by Stroke found that the number of strokes in pregnant women has risen, especially for those in…

Study: Decreased sepsis mortality

A study published by Critical Care Medicine reports that in-hospital mortality rates for sepsis decreased from 47% between 1991 and…

Study: Fatigue common in CHD

A study in Nursing Research found that 40% of patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) reported fatigue more than…
SWAT nursing specialty

SWAT nursing: A unique specialty

What does SWAT stand for? So Where Are They? Smart, Witty, and Talented? Smiling, Willing, Able, Technical? (more…)

Take Note

2/11/10 Three steps to lower childhood obesity Preschool children who do one or more of the following have a lower…
fall falling high risk

Take Note – April 2008

Pam Cipriano to receive ANA’s Distinguished Member Award American Nurse Today Editor-in-Chief Pamela Cipriano, PhD, RN, FAAN, will receive the…
estrogen women woman note

Take Note – August 2007

Good news for younger women taking estrogen     Estrogen therapy may have cardioprotective effects for women who start taking it in…

Take Note – August 2008

Web exclusive! A monthly round-up of clinical and practice news and alerts at www.AmericanNurseToday.com

ibuprofen medication meds pills pill

Take Note – December 2006

CDC recommends HIV screening for everyone New recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) call for routine…
colonoscopy cancer note nurse healthcare

Take Note – December 2007

Previous pneumonia vaccination reduces ICU admissions Among adults hospitalized for pneumonia, those who’ve been vaccinated against the disease are less…
cpr family friend note

Take Note – February 2007

Low-carb diets don’t affect cardiac risk Although diets low in carbohydrates and high in fats and proteins have been popular…
lymes disease tick

Take Note – January 2007

Controversy over new Lyme disease guidelines The new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (ISDA) have run…
type 2 diabetes

Take Note – July 2007

On-line video-based course on emergency preparedness   The need for better coordination between governmental agencies and hospitals became apparent after 9/11…
kid eating healthy child girl veggies vegetable

Take Note – July 2008

Measles outbreak       Between January 1 and April 25, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention received reports of 64 measles…
exercise child children kid obesity

Take Note – June 2008

Failure to rescue is most common safety mistake in hospitals       HealthGrades’ fifth annual Patient Safety in American Hospitals Study found…
alzheimer disease brain testing

Take Note – March 2007

Previous hospital-room occupants may spread MRSA and VRE The risk of acquiring methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE)…
std teenage women girl

Take Note – May 2008

One in four U.S. teenage girls has an STD According to a recent federal study, one in four American teenage…
depression effects health black white note

Take Note – November 2007

Medical illiteracy can kill A 6-year study of 3,260 patients ages 65 and older found that almost 40% of those…
washing wash hands hygiene note

Take Note – October 2007

Medicare to stop reimbursing hospitals for eight preventable conditions Medicare will stop paying hospitals for the extra costs of treating…

Taking the ICU to the Patient

How one rapid response team prevents cardiac arrest and provides other life-saving benefits outside the ICU.

Test strip recall

LifeScan, Inc., has voluntarily recalled eight lots of OneTouch SureStep Test Strips. Lot numbers are at: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm202119.htm.

The beat goes on: A pacemaker primer

With the growing use of cardiac pacemakers, it’s time
to refresh your knowledge of pacemaker basics. This article
describes types of pacemakers, reviews pacemaker codes, and helps you interpret pacemaker rhythm strips.

Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

Until recently, the outlook for patients who remained comatose after cardiac arrest was dire. But therapeutic hypothermia is turning the tide. Learn the facts about this life-saving approach.

What’s the latest on lipoproteins

A new lab technique called segmented gradient gel electrophoresis identifies subclasses of cholesterol and more precisely predicts your patient’s cardiac risk.

When all signs point to long QT syndrome

A patient’s brief loss of consciousness leads to discovery of long QT syndrome. By thinking fast and making all the right moves, you can stave off the threat of torsades de pointes.

WHO releases new hepatitis C guidelines

The World Health Organization (WHO) has released “Guidelines for the screening, care and treatment of persons with hepatitis C infection.”…

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